Idioms/Phrases for SSC Exams- 4

Beat about the bush|  Fight shy of something |   yeoman service To cut a sorry figurebutterflies in my stomach|  Work against time|   In high dudgeon|  By the skin of my teeth|  To go the whole hogFeel his pulse| Taken to task|   Have something up your sleeve| Ruled the roost|  Eat humble pie|  Cock sure|  Dog in manager|  Give up the ghost|   Have a brush with|  Hit the nail on the head |Fall flat Cheek by jowl.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     
Beat about/around the bush 
Meaning:-
  • to talk about something for a long time without coming to the main point                                                                        
Mind Tricks:-
Beat means to avoid and the bush means thickly plants. Beat around/ about the bush means avoiding someone or something rounding the bush.
Usages:-
  1. Stop beating about the bush and tell me what you want.
  2. Don't beat about the bush, just tell me where is my brother is.

                                                                                                                                                          
Fight shy of something
Meaning:-
  • Unwilling to accept something or do something and try to avoid it
  • to attempt of avoid a thing or a person
Usages:-
  1. Successive governments have fought shy of such measures.
  2. He fights shy of parties.
                                                                                                               
 yeoman service 
Meaning:-
  • excellent service
  • efficient or useful help in need                                                      
Mind Tricks:-
Yeoman is someone who does very hard work.
Usages:-
  1. The minister has performed yeoman service.
                                                                           
To cut a sorry figure  
Meaning:-
  • to be ashamed
  • to create a bad impression
Usages:-
  1. Leader cuts a sorry figure in his service.
  2. He cuts a sorry figure in his speech.
                                                                                                                                                          
Had butterflies (in my stomach )
Meaning:-
  • to have a nervous feeling in your stomach before doing something
Usages:-
  1. She always has butterflies in her stomach before a test.
  2. I get buffer-flies in my stomach.
                                                                     

Work against time/clock
Meaning:-
  • to work very fast because you know you only have a limited period of time to do something 
Usages:-
  1. Scientists were working against the time to collect specimens before the volcano erupted again.

In high dudgeon  
Meaning:-
  • in an angry or offended mood and showing other people that you are angry
Usages:-
  1. Slamming the door in his face, she drove off in high dudgeon.
  2. Minister got down in high dudgeon.

By the skin of teeth
Meaning:-
  • If you do something by the skin of your teeth, you only just manage to do it
  • Just succeed in doing something    
Mind Tricks:-
By an amount equal to the thickness of the skin on one's teeth.
Usages:-
  1. He escaped defeat by the skin of his teeth.
  2. We win by the skin of our teeth.
                                                                                                                                                          
To go the whole hog 
Meaning:-
  • to do something thoroughly or completely
Usages:-
  1. I don't know more about this system, I think I should to the whole hog.
  2. It was going to cost so much to repair my computer, I thought I might as well go the whole hog and buy a new one.
                                                                                                                                                       
Feel the pulse   
Meaning:-
  • to try to know someone's views
Usages:-
  1. Reporters try to feel the pulse of public on voting.
  2. Teachers should feel the pulse of students.
                                       
Take to task   
Meaning:-
  • to criticize somebody strongly for something they have done
Usages:-
  1. The local newspaper has been taking the city council to task over its transport policy.
  2. The teacher took Mohan to task for his bad behaviour.



                                                                                                                                                          
Have something up one's sleeve
Meaning:-
  • to keep a plan or an idea secret until you need to use it                                                                        
Mind Trick:-
Sleeve means a part of a piece of clothing that covers all or part of your arm. Sleeve may be very useful to hide chits in the exams.

Usages:-
  1. USA have something up their sleeve.
  2. I have something up my sleeve.
                                                                                                                                                          
Ruled the roost   
Meaning:-
  • to be most powerful member of a group 
  • to be the boss or manager                                                                         
 Mind Trick:-
Roost means a place where birds sleep.
Usages:-
  1. My mom rules the roost at my home.
  2. Our new office manager really rules the roost.


                                                                                                                                                         
Eat humble pie  
Meaning:-
  • to say and show that you are sorry for the mistake that you made                               
Origin:-
From a pun on the old word umbles, meaning 'offal', which was considered to be food for poor people.
Usages:-
  1. You made a mistake and I hope you have to eat humble pie.
  2. You should eat humble pie.
                                     
Cock-sure  
Meaning:-
  • very sure and certain
  • marked by overconfidence; to sure
Usages:-
  1. You are always so cocksure about everything.
  2. His cocksure assertion that he could bed any woman of his choice.            
Dog in the manger   
Meaning:-
  • a person who prevents others from enjoying what he cannot                                                                                     
Mind Trick:-

Manger means a long open box that horses and cows can eat from.
A dog in manger does not allow to eat from manger as you can see in the picture.
Usages:-
  1. Stop being such a dog in the manger and let your sister ride your bike if you are not using it.
 
Give up the ghost 
Meaning:-
  • die, pass away
  • to stop working (of a machine)
Usages:-
  1. He gives up the ghost.
  2. My car finally gave up the ghost.
                                                                           
Have a brush with something
Meaning:-
  • to have encounter
  • to have an experience with something
Usages:-
  1. I have a brush with death.
  2. Our reporters have a brush with real robbers.                                                

Hit the nail on the head 
Meaning:-
  • to do the right thing at right time
  • to do something in the most effective and efficient way
Usages:-
  1. Team India has won the match, captain Dhoni hits the nail on the head.
  2. Police has caught the robbers, they hit the nail on the head.

Fall flat 
Meaning:-
  • to have no effect
  • fail to amuse somebody
Usages:-
  1. Without Jam, the whole evening would have fallen flat.
  2. Your acts have fallen flat.

                                                                                                                                                       
Cheek by jowl 
Meaning:-
  • close together, very close to somebody or something
  • side by side                                                                              
Mind Tricks:-
Jowl means the lower part of somebody's cheek when it is fat and hangs down below their chin. And jowl hangs side by side near your neck.
Usages:-
  1. The guest, packed cheek by jowl, parted as he entered.
  2. Two cars are cheek by jowl on the finishing line.


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